Friday, December 13, 2013

Camping, DIY Outdoor Toilet

How many of my readers LOVE to go camping but HATE having to hold it till you get to the nearest store or having to squat in the bushes?? Well, I'm bringing you a DIY on how to build your own camping toilet.

This DIY is brought to you by: Mr. Homegrown
 
 Putting this toilet together takes just a few minutes. First, find a milk or beer crate and a five gallon bucket. Make sure that the crate you use is large enough to accommodate the bucket. And note, I know of someone arrested for scavenging beer crates behind a strip club, of all places, so be discreet or ask for permission.
  Attaching the Toilet Seat to the Crate

 Next, find a toilet seat. Forage one or pick up a cheap seat at your local hardware store. In an emergency situation, you could also use the one on your regular toilet and simply bolt it back on when the zombie threat has passed and the sewage pipes are flowing again. To attach the seat to the milk crate simply position the plastic bolts and nuts that come with the lid in the center and on the short end of the bottom of the crate. Don’t over tighten.
 
 Cutting Out a Hole in the Crate

 Place the bucket so that it will be appropriately positioned under the seat. Mark the outline of the bucket on the crate with a knife and cut out a circle with a jigsaw or keyhole saw so that the bucket will fit through the former bottom of the crate.


 Attaching Legs to the Crate with Cable Ties

 Cut four pieces of scrap wood (we found some old table legs for a more finished look), and attach them to each corner of the crate so that the bucket projects about a 1/2-inch above the level of the crate. The legs will be approximately 13 1/2-inches. Make sure that the toilet seat will fit snugly against the top of the bucket. We attached the legs with cable ties, but you could also use screws or bolts.


Moving the Spacer

The last step is to move the spacer on the bottom of the lid, so that it does not hit the top of the bucket. Pop it out with a knife or chisel, drill another hole, and reposition.

Your camping toilet is now done and ready for use. Simply lift the crate off the bucket when it comes time to empty the contents.


This toilet is simple to make, easy to clean, and is made of readily available materials. I think this particular design will be useful in emergencies!


*Not sure if that is actual waste in the toilet or not*

1 comment:

  1. Im no expert, but I believe you just made an excellent point. You certainly fully understand what youre speaking about, and I can truly get behind that. Toilet problems

    ReplyDelete